Ovarian Cancer Vaccine:

Ovarian cancer is cancer that starts in
the ovaries. The ovaries are the
female reproductive organs that
produce eggs.


VACCINE CVAC TO TREAT OVARIAN
CANCER
There is a quiet  bit of research into
developing a vaccine, not to prevent,
but to treat ovarian cancer. The idea
behind these vaccines is to stimulate
the body's own immune system to
target and destroy tumor cells.
An Australian company, Prima Biomed,
has performed a number of clinical
trials with its vaccine CVac. Using a
novel technology, CVac's
immunotherapy works by teaching the
immune system to recognise the tumor
cells as foreign. Dendritic cells are
removed from the patient and
stimulated with mannan fusion protein
(MFP), consisting of the antigenic
portion of the tumor antigen mucin-1
(MUC-1) fused to the
immune-enhancing sugar mannan.
The cells are then reinfused back into
the patient to generate primarily a
T-cell-based immune response against
the MUC-1-expressing tumor.


VACCINE NY-ESO-1 TESTED FOR
OVARIAN CANCER
Cornell University's vaccine for ovarian
cancer and melanoma in clinical trials.
The Bioproduction Facility at Cornell
has produced a batch of the cancer
vaccine.
The melanoma trial is being conducted
at New York University Medical Center,
while the ovarian cancer vaccine trial is
at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in
Buffalo, N.Y. The trials are assessing
the safety and the anti-tumor immune
response of the so-called NY-ESO-1
recombinant protein cancer vaccine
alone and in combination with other
agents. The goal of these trials is to
maximize the body's immune response
to the NY-ESO-1 protein.
This vaccine is not intended to prevent
cancer, but one that will stimulate the
body to fight an existing tumor. The
challenge is that the vaccine is made
from molecules -- proteins -- that are
found in our own bodies and do not
normally induce strong immune
responses.


OTHER DEVELOPMENTS
Ovax by Avax Tech in trials