Huntington disease

Huntington's is an inherited, incurable
neurodegenerative disease affecting
35,000 people annually. The disease
gradually kills nerve cells in the brain,
stripping away a person's physical
abilities and causing hallucinations,
antisocial behavior and paranoia.
People diagnosed with the disease
usually die 15 to 20 years from the
onset of symptoms, and there is an
increased rate of suicide among those
struggling with the disease.


TONING DOWN AN ACTIVE PROTEIN
PROVIDES HOPE FOR
HUNTINGTON'S PATIENTS
A huge leap forward in understanding
Huntington's disease may give patients
hope for a cure.
Laboratory tests on skin cells and
post-mortem brain tissue of
Huntington's disease patients
determined that an overactive protein
triggers a chain reaction that causes
brain nerve cells to die. Toning down
the activity of that protein, known as
DRP1, prevented the chain reaction
and kept those cells alive, according to
the research team led by University of
Central Florida Professor Ella
Bossy-Wetzel.